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money. and the average person needs that $2,000 in his pocket to drive the economy. saying that tax breaks for the rich drive consumers lower down to spend is like saying you could start your car by pouring gasoline on the hood. there's no proof, there's no factual data to support it. it's completely a sham to say that. >> and he's a business owner. we need more members of congress to sound like that. if the president is trying to achieve solidarity on raising the top tax rate, these are the voices that can come through for them with that message in a big way. an owner of an automobile supply company says she supports the plan even if it means her own personal rates will go up. . >> i would have higher tax rates, but r more important and more crucial, the middle class would be spending about $3,000 more. >> harry reid kept the focus on the president's winning campaign message of letting the tax cuts expire on incomes over $250,000 a year. >> the people who have done so well during this difficult time with the economy, the richest of the rich are going to have to pay a little more to
who want to come here to help create jobs and help get our economy back on track. so it's very much, i think, in sync with our priority of helping americans get back to work, helping create more jobs for more americans. >> democrats have now said after your response towards the thee house's proposal that ball is now in your court, that the onus is on you to put forth a proposal. is the ball in the republicans' court now? >> well, we remain committed at all -- at all instances to engage in discussions that are serious. i think that the proposal that was delivered here by secretary geithner to the speaker and me yesterday was not a serious proposal. we remain in discussions. i know the speaker as well as i do not want to see us go over the fiscal cliff, but feel very strongly we've got to get serious here. we don't want to increase tax rates. we're not going to increase tax rates. and we want to do something about the spending problem. and remember, the good will, the piece that is, i think, determinive here, the speaker's put new revenues on the table just after the election and said we
, it is not a recession, it has been building for decade-sapping the ability of the american economy to grow, and the average american to rise. to make the u.s. less competitive, less attractive for business, we go back to the fiscal cliff discussion over and over again because unless we get the economy really moving and growing in a long run, these budget problems will occur over and over again. we have identified eight areas where we find, these things would move the needle in a reasonable time frame, two or three or four years we start to see impact and there's quite bipartisan support. and the sustainable budget compromise. number 2, easing immigration now. we need a broader immigration reform, but it is one of the abilities to move rapidly to inject skill to the economy to fill jobs we badly need to fill to sustain our growth. it is not long term solution to the skill problem in america but a critical step we need to take to move the needle. we have got to simplify and realize the corporate tax code. everybody agrees. we just did a survey that included a loss of members of the general p
economy and will her job creation in our country. republicans are committed to continuing to work with the president to come to an agreement to avert the so-called fiscal clef. one reason why we believe that we put revenue on the table as long as it is accompanied by serious spending cuts to avert a crisis. we believe this is the president's request for a balanced approach to this issue, and we are going to continue to work with the president to try to resolve this in a way that is fair for the american people. we all now that we have had the spending crisis coming at us like a freight train. it has to be dealt with. in order to try to come to an agreement, republicans are willing to put revenue on the table. it is time for the president and democrats to get serious about the spending problem our country has. i am optimistic. we can continue to work together to avert this crisis, sooner rather than later. >> good morning. last week, the president's chief political adviser indicated that medicare and medicaid are the main drivers of our deficit. i know we have seen this morning als
different elements of our economy deal with d.h.s. with support of others coming up with what would be best business practices and then if those best business practices were adopted by those within that element of the economy, they would get liability protection, liability immunity. now, some say, wait a second. that leads to a slippery slope that the government will come in and crash in on you. i don't know the perfect answer but i can trying for the lightest regulatory approach we could have. and those worried about the federal government coming in heavy-handed are truly concerned about that, they ought to think about this. if we have a successful cyberattack against a part of our critical infrastructure, my fear is that congress and whoever's present at the time will overreact because the public will require it. wouldn't it be better for us to anticipate it? wouldn't it be better for us to get ahead of the crises and then have a means by which we defend against it? we know we're not ever going to be totally 100% successful. so when it happens to diminish the impact on whatever critical i
and reach an agreement that's going to be good for the country and for the economy. >> then what now? with democratic senator mark warner and kelli ayote. benghazi and obama's second term. with montana governor brian schweitzer, and former hewlett-packard ceo carly fiorina. and susan page of usa today. i am candy crowley. and this is "state of the union." republicans call the fiscal cliff plan a joke, an insult and break from reality. suffice it to say, it is unacceptable to them. the president's opening round offer includes $1.6 trillion in new taxes, $400 billion in savings from medicare and other entitlement programs, $50 billion in new stimulus spending, and an additional $285 billion to fund depreciation and mortgage programs, unemployment insurance benefits, and payroll tax cuts. >> this extra spending, that's actually greater than the amount they're willing to cut. i mean, it's -- it was not a serious proposal. >> while his aides were on capitol hill offering up the opening bid, the president was making his case in pennsylvania campaign style. >> at the end of the day a clear
referred to things that will help make the economy stronger in the short-term and let me explain why we proposed that. what we are suggesting is that we work to rebuild the country's infrastructure, rather than putting it off, doesn't say just to put it off and extend unemployment insurance benefits and help make it easier for americans to refinance mortgages and, tax incentives for business investment and proposed how to do that in a fiscally responsible way we can afford to pay for and matched those proposals, with spending savings that, together as part of the plan, get us down to the point where we stabilize our debt and that is the critical test. >> chris: let me drill down into the spending part of the equation, here they're increases, spending increase as you are proposing. $150 billion, in stimulus, public works projects over several years. a $30 billion extension of unemployment insurance, for one year. extension of payroll tax cuts, mortgage relief, deferral, of automatic cuts for doctors and medicare. here are the spending cuts. unspecified savings from nonentitlement program
it to some of the other developed economies, you can see how well australia is holding up. we've seen growth of just 2.5% in the u.s., 1.5% in canada and zero growth in the uk. locally, cutbacks in government spending weighed on the numbers and lower commodity prices also impacted on cash flow and the government is facing more criticism about its effort to keep the budget in surplus while the economy grows. >> the government has had the objective of making sure that we would bring our budget back to surplus when growth has been around trend. what we've been seeking to do through good budget policy has been to provide maximum flexibility to the reserve bank to a just rate so. the government will always put in place appropriate budget settings which will support growth and jobs. >> still, analysts say growth could slow further as the mining investment boom peaks. yesterday, the bank of australia cut interest rates to a record low of 3% and traders are looking further easing next year to offset the falling talks of trade, the high australian daughter and further cutbacks in government spending.
the economic brake and let this economy continue to build. it seems a little disorienting and ale disconcerting to hear that there may be some people in this congress who put their pledge to a special interest ahead of their pledge of allegiance to this country. and while we are beginning to see some cracks in that cement block that is the special interest group that has gotten these republican members to sign these no-tax pledges, there are not that many. you hear a high ranking republican in the house talking about telling his colleagues to join with president obama to move forward in preserving the tax rates for the middle-class. as the chairman just said, for everyone, including warren buffett, ross perot -- they would get tax relief for the first $250,000 of their income as well. you hear some republicans calling this pledge handcuffs that keep them from moving forward. we would hope in the short periodically have before december 31, we would not let a pledge to a special interest supersede the pledge of allegiance to make to our country. finally, once again, the american people are way ah
of our fragile economy hangs in the fiscal cliff balance, for that let's turn to our distinguished guests. peter goodman. he's the huffington post business editor on a former "new york times"man. we welcome back republican congresswoman nan hayworth and haddy heath, senior policy analyst with the independent women's forum. okay. so mcconnell laughed at the tim geithner proposal. and john boehner says we're at a stalemate. and president obama himself is kind of getting ugly about this enemy's list. we've seen this before from him. my proposal is, republicans have to come with a counter offer. right now. there's no point in blasting obama. just a counter offer. i want to read from today's newspaper. this is what mitch mcconnell said. "higher medicare premiums for the wealthy, an increase in the medicare eligibility age, and a slowing of costs of living increases for programs like social security. and then republicans would agree to include more tax revenue in the deal but not from higher tax rates." now, let's just look at this for a second. we'll go to you first, nan. he wants medicare eli
the economy. >> i've heard of the economy, yes. >> the unemployment rate is still way too elevated. 7.9%. gdp got a pop but most of us agree it is growing well too slowly. this is our biggest near term problem. our biggest near term problem is not the budget deficit. that is a long-term problem, a serious problems, we have a chance to do something about it. . if we can at the same time, help the 2013 economy by giving it a bit of a boost, that means a lot to workers, their paychecks, job availability. i'm very happy to see that was in there. >> when you look at the white house's proposal, what do you think they think they can actually get? >> i think they think they can get the increase in the top rates. that's the biggest kind of thing to finally break the mold on that, to really push back against the kind of grover norquistian asymmetry. i think they can get that. i'm not sure we end up at 396 for the top rate, but i think they will get that. i think probably by giving some on the entitlements as is in their opening bid, they will be able to get back to perhaps some of the stimulus ideas as
in the economy that would indicate that the job market is strong enough to actually bring down that overall unemployment rate. earlier this fall weekly jobless claims had dipped below that line, right before the election, and now they seem to be creeping above it, 393,000 is the number that we're hat today. it's interesting to note that we're going to get an overall unemployment number coming out. some people think based on this number that that could go back above 8% as well. bill: we were so keane on these numbers and waiting for them to tell us what they would tell us about the economy, and how voters were thinking and feeling and how it would play out in the election. a lot of people are now saying hey man, wrist the attention on the numbers. job number one is how to maybe the economy stronger. guess who is coming to the white house for lunch? >> mr. president you're entitled as a president to your own aeu own airplane and own house but not to your own facts. bill: those are topics that will likely not come up today. martha: peanut butter and honey is mitt romney's sandwich. we'll see i
our economy. how to deal with them in a responsible way, get us passed this fiscal cliff, passed in august, only plan in washington, d.c., to prevent these debilitating tax increases from hitting across all of our family owned small businesses. finally, mr. speaker, h.r. 6365, it's the national security and job protection act. we passed that in september. that's the bill that looks specifically at these coming defense cuts. these cuts that secretary of defense leon panetta has called devastating in their impact. i know you do, mr. speaker, leon panetta, former chief of staff to president bill clinton, former chairman of the democratic-led budget committee here in the u.s. house of representatives, current secretary of defense calls these defense cuts devastating. this u.s. house has passed a proposal to prevent that second round of cuts from taking place. it's the only proposal anywhere in this town to have passed. we did in august. we took care of our business and we have yet to have partnership from either the white house or the senate. on that proposal. we took the sequester r
on this debate. this is too important to our economy. it is too important for our families to not get it done. it's not acceptable to me and i don't think it is acceptable to you for just a handful of republicans in congress to hold middle class tax cuts hostage simply because they don't want tax rates on upper income folks to go up. >> then one of those congressmen who's presumably on the president's naughty list today, speaker john boehner, who came out just a few minutes after the president spoke. he talked here on capitol hill a little bit about the stalemate that he sees these talks being at this point. sort of a glum take here from the speaker of the house. obviously he's saying that these negotiations not broken down. they continue to talk but a stalemate is the way he characterizeded that. so tyler, not great news here on capitol hill, but there's another week next week. we'll get another crack at this thing. >> eamon, thanks very much. where do we stand? are we any closer to a deal? we thought we'd give you our little guide with the daily spin on our "rise above" deal meter. as you can s
have to put the changes that happened well down the road because the economy's not ready to handle a lot of these changes in terms of cuts and things like that. but the idea that it feels like they're not going to do anything. you could wand ind up with the situation, let it all ride. we won't deal with any of it right now. >> republicans have had a good pint that tax increases are immediate and spending cuts are put off. >> when is a good time? they're talking about another four or five years of we're not going to be ready to have any type of austerity because it's still this huge debt overhang. what color is that tie? >> i don't know. red, i think. >> is it a red rutgers tie? >> not intentional. i completely forgot about the game. not having paid attention to the most important sports event of the year. >> they lost. but they played well. >> they showed up. i didn't see it, but i was happy they showed up. i have my rise above button back on because i thought i was going to have a rutgers button so which would not have allowed me to -- but now i had room for this. you got no sleep
and the economy. we agree with that. but if your number one priority is jobs and the economy, you don't grow the economy and create jobs by raising taxes on small businesses, the very people who create those jobs. >> greta: white house press secretary today jay carney when asked when the next meeting with congressional members would be, the answer was, quote, it would come at the appropriate time. >> nobody knows what that means. >> greta: that's my point. look, all of you have had a vacation, campaigning, doing that for the last three months. you've been about this fiscal cliff for a year and a half. now the president is going out to do, as you say, campaigning. the press secretary says there will be a meeting between leaders at the appropriate time. the appropriate time seems like pretty much right now. >> well, it is. what you're seeing by the president and democrats is an attempt to run out the clock. i think they think they gain leverage if the pressure builds toward the end of the year. frankly you're hearing a lot of prominent democrats saying we should go over the fiscal cliff and le
just return to a normal economy like we had in 2007, those policies of george bush where we had 18.5% of our economy coming to the federal government as revenue, that would be another $419 billion. so combined, that would be $750 billion per year of additional revenue. now, president obama's proposal of punishing success, it's hard to say exactly what it will be, but somewhere around $75 billion. it's a tenth of what we get with economic growth. and the rob with punishing success, with increasing marginal tax rates or really increasing taxes, is you put at risk that growth that is ten times more effective. so again, i'm just looking at what works. and we need to calm the markets. i don't want to play brinksmanship. it's a unfortunate that the president really isn't negotiating in good faith. he's just moving the goal posts. >> although the lead story on the "wall street journal" is about how the president may be relaxing that position. he may not insist on returning to the pre-bush tax cut rates for those wealthiest 2% or whatever the situation is. that may not mean that he's not l
're out with a view on your next year that doesn't sound too rosy. you talk about the economy contracting half a percent. challenges in the core countries. so walk us through how important the german vote is tomorrow and whether greece gets its aid as to the more broad brooutlook. >> the outlook is not improving. it's deteriorating for the eurozone. economic fundamentals are getting worse particularly in the countries of germany and france. these are the countries we revise down the most. in the periphery, there are signs that the recession is stabilizing. we're below the consensus. typical view is that the economy will broadly stagnate next year, we think it will continue to shrink and the ecb will continue to cap interest rates and perhaps at shall point the bond buying program will be in spain. >> and so when we talk about the sequence of events that markets are looking for the next couple of months, the main one still seems to be when spain asks for aid. pushed into the first quarter of next year now in your view? >> i think there are two windows of opportunities really. the first one
for the economy. that money should be invested. you are hearing, though, from the white house, we have already put in place a trillion dollars of cuts. we have something on the table. we are the republican proposals. we are talking politics in that nobody wants to go first and really lay out what they are about for fear that there will be a tremendous political consequence on things like cuts to medicare. lori: those cuts, as you know, nearly not enough. the second quarter gdp reading extremely disappointed. let's just call a spade a spade. we know hurricane sandy will shave another point or so off of growth. >> i think it is. that is why despite all of this, what i think of as process, it is a lot of posturing. it is a lot of politicking. people still remain convinced that these guys cannot be serious. they cannot be serious about pushing us off the fiscal cliff because it will have bad responses to republicans. the obama people will be able to say you gave away the ability to keep taxes down on 98% of americans. and for the president, the idea that he would allow the taxes to go up, again, on ap
, that is good news, you saw growth in economy and in the last few moments we moved higher and we are positive for the week. when you check it out and industrials we are up 44 points and most of those names on the dow are in the green, names like hewlett-packard and caterpillar and bank of america and united healthcare doing well. the fiscal cliff headline after headline continues to be in the forefront and on everybody's mind that this is what we are seeing, a decent market and the u.s. dollar being weaker today has been a factor in the strength we are seeing as well. connell: treasury secretary tim geithner meeting with congressional leaders and doing so as we speak. dagen: peter barnes live from capitol hill. peter: treasury secretary tim geithner arriving at our or so ago to hold meetings with top congressional leaders. senate democratic leader harry reid, now he is meeting with house speaker john boehner, that meeting just getting underway, after that meeting with senate republican leader mitch mcconnell and house democratic leader nancy pelosi and with the president and republicans on ra
. if you believe that? >> it's hard to imagine that the president would want to send the economy into another recession. that would be a terrible start to his second term and it would cripple the rest of the spectrum. everything else that he would want to do. it would seem a bit suicidal to do that. that being said, there is a scenario where he thinks that he might be able to quickly turn around and get tax cuts back in place. it depends on how much you think going over the fiscal cliff will affect the economy. others say it will be devastating and others say it will be back. it depends on where you stand when you are making these sort of analyses. megyn: it feels like we are left with the economy -- with people's livelihoods and growth in the country and salaries and unemployment benefits. we are just left. both sides are accusing the other of being the untethered risk taker. last night speaker boehner made remarks demanding leadership on the president. here he is. >> this is not a game. jobs are on the line. the american economy is on the line. this is a moment for adults leade
and is fair. that would be good for businesses, for our economy, for future generations, and i believe both parties can and will work together in the coming weeks to get that done. we know how that gets done. we're going to have to raise a little more revenue. we have to cut spending we don't need. and if we combine those two things, we can create a path where america's paying its bills while still being able to make investments in the things we need to grow like education and infrastructure. we know how to do that but in washington nothing's easy so there's going to be prolonged negotiations and all of us are going to have to get out of our comfort zones to make that happen. i'm willing to do that. i'm hopeful that enough members of congress in both parties are willing to do that, as well. we can solve these problems, but where the clock is really ticking right now is on middle class taxes. at the end of the year, middle class taxes currently in place are set to expire, middle class tax cuts surge in place are set to expire. there are two things that can happen. if conditioning does nothin
impact on the entire economy. obviously, toys and other things, as well. >> the president's plan calls for raising the tax rates on americans earning $250,000 or more. most republicans remain dead set against the president's plan. >> that's true. i think, though, we have to take a look at the larger context. the larger context is we have a math problem. we have $2.5 trillion that we're taking in every year on the federal government and $3.5 trillion that we're spending. so, we're going to need a balanced approach of both revenue and spending cuts to teat there. so, that's what the president has been talking about and certainly something i can support. >> "the wall street journal" today senior administration officials say the white house not making any new offers until republicans change their opposition to raising top tax rates in this country. as a businessman, that would be directly affected by an impasse like that, as would millions of americans. how do you feel about that? >> how i feel, i'm 100% confident we'll resolve the fiscal cliff pretty much a day or two before christmas. wh
. again, the economy is doing a little better. the unemployment numbers have been a little better, but what's the impact? >> 2 million people -- >> 2 million would lose. >> -- would lose income. here's the thing. there's a lot of talk of these people are looking or not looking for jobs, they're just taking this check. that's not the case. there's only one job for every three folks looking for a job. so there literally is not a job available for two of those people. so they have this income, unemployment insurance which keeps them in the economy, a functioning part of the economy, so they can spend the money. so the economic policy institute went ahead and extrapolated. if you were to keep this $30 billion cost of extended unemployment insurance, actually, that will pump another $15 billion to $18 billion into the economy because these folks are spending money. and that's what fuels our economy. >> some of the people who argue that we should go off the fiscal cliff, that it will push them to negotiate a sort of more thoughtful deal -- >> right. >> -- they say that it's not a fiscal
the fiscal cliff? >> everybody agrees. >> going over the fiscal cliff will hurt our economy and will hurt job creation in our country. >>er -- every family in america will see their taxes automatically go up at the beginning of next year. >> shepard: so how to avoid that. >> the president and congress will either fail together or we will succeed together. >> there has to be a deal. there has to be an agreement. >> and if they can't come up with a compromise, we are all going to pay the price. plus, they are some of the biggest names in baseball. bonds, clemens, sosa. all three tainted by accusations they used performance enhancing drugs. but should that keep them from cooper's town? tonight, the great debate over baseball's hall of fame ballot but first from fox this wednesday night, the president hopes who have the framework of a deal to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff by christmas. president obama says he would like congress to pass a bill even sooner to extend tax cuts for the middle class families. and he invited some of those middle class americans to the white house today to help make
talking point that lowering taxes on rich people stimulates the economy. i have a degree in economics and my dad was an economics professor. and i know that it's the opposite. >> bill: yeah. >> caller: to stimulate the economy, you have to tax rich people who are just sitting on that money. they're refusing to use it to help the economy. and the government uses that money to put people to work, rebuilding bridges schools hiring people to inspect our food so we don't die from eating peanut butter or getting shots. >> bill: amen, amen. hey, paul, it has been proven, right? right, igor? we had eight years. >> in great growth and great jobs. in a consumer-based economy where people have to buy -- you have to participate in business for the economy to grow, you've gotta give -- as the president said, you've gotta grow the economy from the middle out. if the relief doesn't go toward middle class americans, if they can't participate in the economy, yeah, you're going to have a top 1% or 2% folks who do really
. it's not going to inject demand into the economy that will create jobs. this is a bad deal all around. what we need is to make a judgment about what we do. does it reduce the deficit? >> joining me now is senator sherrod brown. senator, good to have you with us tonight. your comments on what nancy pelosi has to say about revenue. >> she's right. you look at a little history in the 1990s. the upper one or 2 or 5% were paying more in taxes. just a little bit more. we had 21 million private sector job creation, net job creation. when george bush cut taxes on the wealthy in 2001 and 2003, we've had no real job growth and no wage growth during this past decade. we're finally now after ten straight years of manufacturing job decline hitting places like toledo and cleveland and cincinnati particularly hard, we're seeing now in the last two years after the auto rescue, after we're doing some of the right things here, we're seeing job growth. i agree with what nancy pelosi said. history improves itself. >> so based on history, this is about math and not ideology. the sense i get on the hill to
our economy. >> reporter: republicans led by house speaker john boehner says he should quit campaigning and take care of the business at hand. republicans say they are willing to consider raising more revenue but they want to see spending cuts to go along with it. >> we need to hear they are willing to make spending cuts now, not promises of spending cuts sometime if the future. to me the tidal waves that are coming at us is social security and medicare and the new health care law. >> reporter: now house democratic leader nancy pelosi is calling the speakers to bring the tax to the floor by tuesday or she will try to force a vote. boehner is not likely to buckle under pressure so it seems like a standoff. >> gregg: sfuaf. what a surprise? they want to resolve this fiscal crisis or lack in his real compromise. john boehner is leading an attack on the lack of progress. >> there is a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. it was not a serious proposal. so right now we're almost nowhere. >> gregg: almost nowhere. how about that? staff writer for roll call joins us live. the preside
is in terms of how the economy is going to perform and was going to happen to the trajectory of house prices. in environment with strong house prices in this market are generally rising, i agree a very low down payment will accumulate down payment for a reasonably steady income. so the risk of default is manageable and recovered within the premiums. the problem is if we feel we are in an environment of slower economic growth so there's not a lot of wind under this is about which means the possibility you can have recessions is more likely because you're starting for me lower growth rate in house prices that may in fact for a period of time be in a much lighter treasure to read. then i think it is a case or a question about whether the low down payment program is necessarily the best for the borrower when you factor in -- here's where i was a down payment actually does matter because it combination of a borrower if they lose their job and can't make payments being able to sell the house half the loan is really determination of whether you're going to default. if there's a no down payment of p
of the economy that george w. bush left him with! he didn't come in and say gee the first thing i want to do is raise food stamps, a lot has been the unemployment insurance. if has been to address the worst financial crisis we've had since the great depression. >> since herbert hoover. >> the last businessman president. >> obama: both parties say we should keep middle class taxes low. the senate's already passed a bill to keep income taxes from going up on middle-class families. democrats in the house are ready to do the same thing. if we can just get a few house republicans on board i'll sign this bill as soon as congress sends it my way. >> tax cuts for the 98%. slight raise in taxes for the top 2%. seems like a pretty good deal. >> stephanie: yes. oh, by the way. [ ♪ "world news tonight" ♪ ] , robert rice as usual has a great piece of why we should stop obsessing about the federal budget deficit. he knows something about something. he was around when clinton -- remember that economy? okay. he said i wish pres
. >> the concern people have is the world economy is in a very fragile state right now. i don't have to say what the problems of the eurozone have, they're very manifest. but the global economy as a whole, there's a lack of confidence, a worry about where it's going. so if you in america, and people have a lot of confidence in america in this regard, if you can sort out this issue, then even though that doesn't sort out all the problems of the american or global economy, it would be a big boost and give people a sense of confidence that there was -- you guys have got your act together. the decisions were being taken, and i think it will be good for you and good for us. so i hope you do it. i believe you will. i know right now there's bound to be tough negotiations. the president has been re-elected and i think that gives the situation its own special momentum. i hope you resolve it and then we're going to have to take some tough decisions over our way, too. >> very quickly. there was a cute video of hillary clinton here in washington over the weekend, and it had a clip from you in there. i'll pl
without concern for america's economy or standing in the world. we can't keep running trillion dollar deficits every year and throw a tantrum if someone suggests the taxpayers shouldn't keep turning every program they can dream up. let's take a look at the so-called thelma and louise democrats so he know who he's talking about. to say they are willing to go over the fiscal cliff, we have those who say they are not willing to support any reforms to entitlements. dick durbin says he would be willing to talk about it but only after a deal is struck. >> you have a difference of opinion in all political parties. i don't know many republicans who agree with mitch mcconnell. this is the guy who said his number one political goal was to get obama out of office. i think it's all positioning. you have got a bunch of democrats and mcconnell positioning themselves for negotiation. martha: tucker, what do you think? >> i think the republicans are being outnegotiated by an incredibly aggressive democratic party. they are demanding tax hikes on highest earner. an elevation in the debt limit which is
's an opportunity to go and compete in a balanced way in this economy today but there's a head start. and so -- of generational transferring of wealth. finally with equality that's taking place since the civil rights movement you have more alignment of wealth. now it's becoming 55 -- >> you're talking about such an infinitesimally small number of people. we could fit all of those people in this room. >> you're talking about african-americans in the united states that are subject to the he state tax? >> i'm not arguing the actual merits of the issue, i'm telling you the politics of it. the congressional black caucus voted with george bush. >> i know they did. >> we're going to talk about the politics of it. >> they are. >> if we're going to talk about the politics of it, let's be explicit. we're talking about multi-millionaires. we're not talking about african-american population. >> we're talking about job generators. >> we are talking about multi-millionaires, people who have over $10 million, $5 million as an individual to pass on to their children and don't want to be taxed on every dolla
-in-class fuel economy. engineered to move heaven and earth. ♪ guts. glory. ram. jon: fox news alert for you now. we are awaiting remarks from president obama. he is pushing his plan to try to avoid the year-end fiscal cliff. this speech comes ahead of a meeting between the president and business leaders later today discussing actions the white house says are aimed at growing the economy and finding a quote, balanced approach to reducing the nation's deficit. let's bring in our panel. mary katharine ham editor-at-large of hot air.com and fox news contributor. peter mirijanian former advisor to the clinton-gore and gore-lieberman campaigns. when the president arrives at the white house to speak, he will have people behind him, ordinary americans who reached out to the white house and want their $2,000 middle class tax cut preserved. republicans are saying this is essentially a campaign stunt, a campaign appearance kind of event of the he won the election. he should get on the business of governing. what do you say? >> well, one quick observation, jon. i think what you're seeing, what i think is i
economy and hurt job creation in our country. this is not good for our country. as simple as that and the president understands it. >> they're saying president needs to get in there, needs to negotiate with democrats into line if necessary. is that not happening. are you hearing congresswoman schwartz, from the president as all? >> let me say the administration is keenly interested in working with the senate and the house to get this done. the fact that the president is out and sulactually out in my district on friday morning talking to people what about is at stake for this country, for their families and the nation is something very important for him to be doing. always engaging the voters, the public is an important thing to do. and at the same time we should be and are having broad discussions about how we move forward. what we really need is we need republican leadership. just quoted them, mitch mcconnell and john boehner, to actually be sitting down and saying, look, there are places where we do agree. let's start where we agree. let's begin to have that discussion.
that exploded in the open. saying that it reads like a democratic wish-list and could plunge the economy back into recession. oh joy. welcome here. i'm bill hemmer. live in "america's newsroom.". martha: good morning, bill. bill: we'll find the silver lining in this, aren't we? martha: we are. bill: that is our quest. martha: i'm martha maccallum. here are the basics when they put forth through tim geithner yesterday from the president. 1.6 trillion in new taxes. that is the opening part of the deal. 50 billion in new stimulus spending. we already had a lot of backlash in stimulus in previous packages. this is interesting element here. new executive power to raise the debt limit. that is what caused so many of these discussions because they bump up against the debt limit and not be able to go back this. there is executive power plea to be able to do that without going back to confess. republicans are saying where is the balance? where is the spending cut side of the equation. the president said he wanted it to be a balanced deal. watch. melissa: so right now all eyes are on the white house. t
with sending the economy over the fiscal cliff. >> the speaker's remarks riled the left and provoked this response from senate majority leader harry reid. >> he says that democrats have got to get serious about cuts, spending cuts. where is the disconnect, then? >> i don't understand his brain, so you should ask him. okay? >> with only a handful of legislative days left on the congress's calendar before the looming fiscal cliff becomes a raw reality, will the president and house gop find a way over the latest road black and back to the bargaining table? >> why did the white house decide to have this as their opening volley when they knew the response would be a negative one that they drew? >> was it hardball opening? yeah, of course it was. the question is, what's the counteroffer? >> i would imagine there has to -- tim geithner is too smart of a guy in this administration is filled with smart people. they must have a serious strategic plan. >> let's get straight into this and joining me now is senator barbara boxer, democrat from california. senator, it is great to have you with me
, so we can engage in tax reform and get the economy going again. we're being serious that offer yesterday was simply not serious. >> cantor was speak iing antd t deal presented by treasury secretary timothy geithner. today the white house released details about that deal. in spite of republican claims of $400 billion in cuts, the deal proposed $600 billion in cuts. $350 billion in medicare savings and $350 billion to other programings next year. john boehner basically lied yesterday when he said the white house had not offered specifics. today he complained about those specifics. >> the white house spent three weeks trying to develop a proposal and they send one up here that calls for $1.6 trillion in new taxes, calls for a little -- not even $400 billion in cuts and they want to have this extra spending that's actually greater than the amount they are willing to cut. i mean, it's -- it was not a serious proposal. and so right now, we're almost nowhere. . >> boehner offered the republican counter to the white house plan. >> our original framework still stands. instead of raising
. >> eric: it's not a bad call. this could be terrible for the economy and hurt jobs and businesses. but honestly, if you are ready, america, if you are ready, hold your nose, take a deep breath and take the medicine. it will fix the problem and the deficit problem as long as everything in the fiscal cliff happens. as long as sequestration happens it will hurt defense. tax rate goes up. eventually you will get someone out, to get that president out and get president who wants lower tax rates and congress that wants the lower tax rate and maybe a senate. it would hurt dramatically. best time to do it is now. >> andrea: there are two schools of thought here. one if you follow twitter or watch republicans who are on the pundit circle, they say let them go off cliff and let obama own that. there is another one that says just let him have what he wants and then when the economy nose dives he will have to own it. republicans are going to get blamed anyway. do you feel strong about either one of those? >> dana: not necessarily. i do think i see in "washington post," headline, obama offers
on the debt. >>> all the numbers indicate that going off the fiscal cliff would hurt the u.s. economy in the short term. but could it be the best thing in the long run? going off that fiscal cliff. to this point most of the conversation has been focused on what happens in january, and for good reason. there's no deal in congress. tax rates go up for a lot of folks, all americans. and a $1.2 trillion worth of defense and spending cuts will be automatically enacted. excuse me, that fiscal cough i told you about. the alternative minimum tax kicks in and put it all together and the results are pretty. the economy would contract by half a percent in 2013. unemployment would raise to 9.1% and the economy would experience what cbo said would be judged as a recession. but after that, then things start to look pretty good. the cbo says after next year by the agency's estimates economic growth will pick up. the labor market will strengthen returning output to its potential level. 5.5% by 2018. essentially if no deal is struck, the federal government would be forced to do what it's refused to do
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